The bookworm sez

Child of the Civil Rights Movement

 

 


What was your Mama’s favorite thing to do when she was a kid your age?

If you ask her, she’ll probably tell you all about her favorite game and the toy she loved most. She might tell you stories about the trips she took with her family. She’ll remember books she loved, pets she owned, music she danced to, and she’ll tell you about them if you ask.

And some day, you’ll have the same kind of stories for your child, too.

In the new book, Child
of the Civil Rights
Movement
by Paula Young Shelton and Raul Colón, a young girl relates one-of-a-kind memories of an event that changed our nation. Child Movement Young Colon, Wade $22.99,

The bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3, and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

The bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3, and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.



One day, when Paula’s father and mother were watching TV, they saw the Freedom Riders on the news, and they were angry to see the Riders’ bus on fire. They knew they needed to go south to help.

Paula was a little scared. She was born in New York City, where there were no Jim Crow laws. She thought maybe Jim Crow was a big bird in the sky, waiting to snatch her up. Then she found out that Jim Crow was a man who didn’t sound very nice and there were some not-so-nice laws named after him.

In the South, there were places that Paula’s family couldn’t go. Restaurants sent them away because of the color of their skin. Once, Paula sat down and cried because she was hungry, and the restaurant still wouldn’t let them in.

But there were places they could go, and that was fun. There was a swimming pool nearby, and other businesses owned by African Americans. Whenever possible, people got together at Paula’s father and mother’s house. Even though they weren’t really related, Paula and her sisters considered everybody as family.

When it was time to host dinner at their house, Paula liked to sit on the floor of the dining room and listen to the voices as everybody talked about marching. All together, the voices sounded like music. And when it was time, there were more voices, marching for Civil Rights in places like Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, and Georgia. Paula marched, too, even though she was just a little girl. She was proud that someday she’d be making changes of her own.

Child of the Civil Rights Movement
is an interesting children’s book, mostly because the story practically begs to become an adult book.

As the daughter of Civil Rights leader Andrew Young, author Paula Young Shelton has many unique, kid’s-eye-view memories of various important figures and events in the Movement. While this may be of interest to a child, I think grown-ups will get way more out of Shelton’s story. Fortunately, while you’re enjoying her narrative, your kids will enjoy artist Raul Colón’s illustrations.

I think Child of the Civil Rights Movement
is a bit overly-wordy for squirmy toddlers but for kids ages 6 and up, it’s a great first-hand story. If you’re looking for a mini-memoir as told from a kid’s POV, remember this one.