SCAM ALERT







If it’s too good to be true, it probably is – and isn’t. It probably is too good to be true, therefore, not true. And it isn’t true – therefore not true, either way you parse it. If it doesn’t pass your reflex smell test – in other words if you’re not expecting a windfall refund – and if you never heard of the business or agency purportedly issuing you one – DON’T TRY TO CASH IT. You won’t get to keep the money (if you ever get it in the first place) when the financial system discovers it’s phony, but it’ll be too late for you. The scammers will already have all of your personal and financial information which is what they’re really after. Then they can clean you out, or take a Mediterranean cruise, courtesy of your bank account, or some similar revolting development. Not to make light of a serious situation, but it does have its lighter side. Notice who these checks are made to: Lloyd Arrington. Unbeknownst to the scammers, he’s sheriff of Blount County. They kind of laid an egg on that one, hey? The point is, it can happen to anyone. If you get a suspicious check like this, you can refer it to law enforcement, and probably should in case there might be a pattern they can discover. But the main thing is: DON’T BITE! Let law enforcement look at it, let the bank look at it, let Walmart look at it (they’re said to be pretty sharp at sniffing scams out), but do yourself a favor and DON’T TRY TO CASH IT. Consign it to the dustbin of experience, and go your merry way. – Ron Gholson

If it’s too good to be true, it probably is – and isn’t. It probably is too good to be true, therefore, not true. And it isn’t true – therefore not true, either way you parse it. If it doesn’t pass your reflex smell test – in other words if you’re not expecting a windfall refund – and if you never heard of the business or agency purportedly issuing you one – DON’T TRY TO CASH IT. You won’t get to keep the money (if you ever get it in the first place) when the financial system discovers it’s phony, but it’ll be too late for you. The scammers will already have all of your personal and financial information which is what they’re really after. Then they can clean you out, or take a Mediterranean cruise, courtesy of your bank account, or some similar revolting development. Not to make light of a serious situation, but it does have its lighter side. Notice who these checks are made to: Lloyd Arrington. Unbeknownst to the scammers, he’s sheriff of Blount County. They kind of laid an egg on that one, hey? The point is, it can happen to anyone. If you get a suspicious check like this, you can refer it to law enforcement, and probably should in case there might be a pattern they can discover. But the main thing is: DON’T BITE! Let law enforcement look at it, let the bank look at it, let Walmart look at it (they’re said to be pretty sharp at sniffing scams out), but do yourself a favor and DON’T TRY TO CASH IT. Consign it to the dustbin of experience, and go your merry way. – Ron Gholson