Officers receive trauma training



Lt. Leslie Loggins of the Oneonta Fire Department attempts to stop the bleeding on a realistic training dummy.

Lt. Leslie Loggins of the Oneonta Fire Department attempts to stop the bleeding on a realistic training dummy.

Oneonta’s first responders participated in Special Operations Medical Emergency Training (S.O.M.E.T) last week and learned how to provide aid to trauma victims. According to Dale Davis, RN, BSN, and S.O.M.E.T. trainer, “It is important for first responders to be able manage trauma patients while medics are responding.”

Law enforcement officers and fire and rescue units are usually the first to arrive on the scene of an accident. In the past, first responders were not able to provide aid for trauma injuries.

Assistant police Chief Judy Underwood said, “I’ve previously administered CPR on the scene of an accident but I was not able to render aid to victims of trauma. I wasn’t trauma trained.”

Underwood is glad to see the mindset change and allow first responders to receive this training because “more damage can be done while waiting for medics to arrive.”

There have been instances in which lawsuits against law enforcement officers were filed for “failure to render aid.”

Jeffrey Kerby, UAB’s division director of acute care, created this classroom and practical hands-on training as a way for first responders to learn to manage trauma patients. Once trained, first responders have the ability to provide care to trauma patients in a field environment.

According to Davis, “The most common death is due to blood loss in a trauma accident.”